Dinosaur Style Hand Balancing

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

I cover hand-stand pushups in Dinosaur
Bodyweight Training and in the Dinosaur
Training Military Press and Shoulder Power
Course.

And I describe John Grimek's off the chart
hand-stand pushup and tiger-bend workouts
in my John Grimek training course.

So it's probably not surprising that many
readers have asked me to do a book or
on Dino-style handstand training or
Dinosaur hand balancing.

For example, this was in the e-mail box
last night:

"Hey Brooks,

I absolutely love the John Grimek course.
Read through it four or five times the
first go around, and pick it up every
few months.

Grimek is one of my personal 'iron
heroes' and you did a spectacular
job on it.

If you were to do a strictly hand balancing
course I, along with many others probably,
would buy it in a heartbeat.

Thank you, and keep up the good work.

Blake"

And that's a typical email. I get this every
request every week or two.

But here's the problem.

I'm not a hand balancer. Never have been.

When I did handstand pushups by the bushel
basket, I did them with my feet touching the
wall, not the free-standing kind.

And I can't learn hand-balancing now
because I have glaucoma or pre-glaucoma
(the doc isn't sure which), and upside down
training is on the "don't do" list.

So I'm not going to do a hand-balancing
course.

But that's okay, because two of my good
friends have excellent hand-balancing courses
available.

Bill Hinbern has a killer course on hand balancing.

It's a hard-copy course, and it's off the charts
good.

You can grab it right here:


In addition, John Wood has released a terrific
modern reprint (with his own commentary) of
a very rare hand balancing course written by
Sig Klein -- who may have been one of the
greatest hand balancers of all time.

It's available in e-book on Kindle, and you can
find it right here:


Both of these courses are old-school, both of
them are very well done, and both of them
are Dino-approved.

So if you want to give upside down training
a try, grab both of them -- and learn hand
balancing from the masters!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

************************************************

Questions and Answers for Dinos!

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

We had a great show yesterday on the first
official episode of Physical Culture Radio. If
you missed the show, you can download the
podcast right here:

http://superhumanradio.com/

And please give us feedback about the show.
We need to hear from you.

Physical Culture Radio runs every Thursday
at 12:00 EST.

For the first couple of shows, we're going to
cover the topic of building and maintaining
lifelong strength and health -- or, as I called
it on the show, "successful aging."

Some people use the term "anti-aging" -- but
I don't because the truth os the matter is, we
all age. The only alternative is to stop living,
and that's not a good alternative.

The key is, to age well -- meaning to stay
strong and healthy and fit and active.

So that's what we're going to focus on for
the first few shows.

And we're going to try to make the show as
helpful as possible -- and as organic as possible.
One thing we're going to do is to solicit training
questions from listeners -- and answer them
on the show.

So if you have questions about diet, nutrition,
or exercise for older Dinos, send them on in
and we'll see if we can work them into the
show.

Similarly -- I'm working on volume 2 in my
new series of courses, Dinosaur Training
Secrets -- and one thing I'm going to do
is to answer any questions that anyone may
have about something we covered in volume
1 of the series.

So if you have Dinosaur Training Secrets,
vol. 1, feel free to shoot in a training question,
and we'll try to answer it in vol. 2.

If you don't have the little monster, start by
going here to grab it -- in your choice of
hard copy or Kibndle e-book:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_secrets_01.html

And please note -- I could charge some serious
clams to answer training questions -- but I'm
doing it for free on Physical Culture Radio and
in the Dinosaur Training Secrets courses, because
I think it adds lots of value for you -- and because
it's my way of saying THANK YOU for being a part
of what we do.

By the way, we're getting great feedback about
releasing the new ciourses as Kindle e-books.

Readers are saying:

1. It's fast and convenient.

a. And you don't even need a Kindle device --
you can download an app that allows you to
read Kindle e-books on your phone or your
computer.

2. I like not having to pay for shipping.

a. I like not having to charge you for shipping --
especially if you are an overseas reader.

3. It's easy to read, because you can increase
the size of the print.

a. I'm with you on that one!

4. My wife loves it because I don't leave books
and courses all over the house.

4a. Tell your wife that Trudi agrees 10,000 percent.

4b. Also, it might leave room for a power rack
and a thousand or two thousand pounds of iron
in the living room.

4c. Don't laugh -- Tommy Kono had squat stands
and a barbell in his living room once.

5. I can read on the bus or subway on the way
to work, or read during lunch time, or read while
I'm travelling.

6. It's about time you did this!

6a. About seven bazillion readers have said this.

6b. They're right.

6c. Trudi has been urging me to do this for the
past year or two. She was right, too.

On the other hand, many readers prefer hard-
copy because they just like ink on paper -- and
I understand that, too.

The bottom line is, we're going to continue to
offer books and courses the old-fashioned way --
ink on paper -- and we're going to continue to
offer books and courses as Kindle e-books. In
other words, we're going to continue to bring
you top-flight training information -- in both
hard-copy and e-book.

And before I go -- one final note -- issue no. 2
of the Dinosaur Files quarterly has been mailed,
and if you ordered it, the little monster should
be landing in your mail box very soon. Shoot me
an email and let me know how you like it!

If you forgot to order, here's the link:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles_quarterly.html

Note that we have copies of issue no. 1 of the
Dinosaur Files quarterly -- so if you missed it,
grab both of them. You'll want the complete
set.

As always, thanks for reading and have a great
day. If you train today, make it a good one -- and
remember to send in those questions!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. We just released the Dinosaur Training Military
Press and Shoulder Power course as a Kindle e-book.
Go here to grab a copy:

http://www.brookskubik.com/militarypress_kindle.html

P.S. 2. My other books and courses -- and Dinosaur
Training DVD's -- and the world-famous Legacy of
Iron novels -- are right here at Dinosaur
Headquarters:

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

P.S. 3. Thought for the Day: "The iron is your
friend, and so are good books." -- Brooks
Kubik

*********************************************

How to Train for Lifelong Strength and Health!

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

Let me start with some big breaking news, and
then we'll talk training.

I'm going to be doing a regular weekly podcast
on Carl Lanore's SuperHuman Radio.

The show will be called Physical Culture Radio.
It will air every Thursday at 12:00 noon EST.

You can listen to the live show or listen to
the download later on.

You can find us right here -- every Thursday --
at 12:00 noon:

http://superhumanradio.com/

We're going to start out by covering a very
interesting topic -- healthy aging, which I
define as staying strong and healthy and
active and fit for your entire life.

We'll discuss various aspects of healthy
aging in a series of shows. Listen to them,
and if you have questions, shoot them in
to me by email. We'll try to work them into
later shows.

On the training front -- since we're going to
be talking about healthy aging on the show,
let's prime the pump a bit by covering an
important aspect of it right now.

The training component.

A couple of nights ago, I saw a very interesting
interview.

It featured a man named Randy Lewis, who
happens to be one of the greatest wrestlers
of all time.

He won the NCAA championships 2x while
wrestling for Dan Gables' legendary Iowa
Hawkeyes -- and went on to win the Olympic
gold medal in 1984.

I actually saw him wrestle in the Junior
Nationals. He was probably the best high
school wrestler I ever saw.

Anyhow, in the interview, he was talking
about how he got the itch to compete again.

This was when he was in his 40's. Not old,
but almost twice as old as his competitors
would have been.

He had continued to work out after he
retired from competition -- but there's
a big difference between the kind of
workouts he did when he was training
to win the Olympic gold medal and the
kind of workouts he did after he retired.

So when he got the competition bug,
he decided to ramp things up.

And, of course, he started to train hard,
and put in lots of mat time and lots of
time on other work -- running and lifting
and cardio work, and so on -- and he
ended up overdoing things and getting
hurt.

So he tried again another time.

Same result.

After this happened a few times, he began
to wonder if it would ever be possible to
compete again.

That's when someone made a very good
suggestion.

"Don't train for it -- just compete."

So he did -- and he entered the Olympic
try-outs at age 50 -- and beat two younger
athletes before losing a close match to a
third wrestler.

And all of the men he wrestled were 20
or 25 years younger than he was. And
they were top wrestlers in their own right.
So notching a couple of wins at age 50
was pretty darn impressive. In fact, it
was absolutely remarkable.

But the interesting thing is how he got
there -- not by gearing up and going
crazy and training 8 hours a day and
doing the full-bore Eye of the Tiger
thing -- but by easing up in his training
and doing just enough to be effective
on the mat -- but not so much that he
hurt himself.

That's a vitally important lesson for all
older athletes -- and for all older trainees.
At a certain time in your life, you do better
with less -- and you do better by balancing
hard work with plenty of time for recovery
and recuperation.

And that's the message of the day. If you're
an older trainee, take it to heart -- and if
you're a younger trainee, file it away for
future reference. There will come a time
when you will need it.

As always, thanks for reading and have a
great day. If you train today, make it a
good one -- and be sure to catch me on
Physical Culture Radio!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. If you're an older trainee, be sure to read
Gray Hair and Black Iron -- and the Dinosaur
Files quarterly, which includes plenty of great
workouts and training ideas for older Dinos:

http://www.brookskubik.com/grayhair_blackiron.html

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles_quarterly.html

P.S. 2. Our Dinosaur Training e-books are getting
off-the-chart reviews. Go here to grab them:

http://www.brookskubik.com/militarypress_kindle.html

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_secrets_01.html

P.S. 3. My other books and courses are right here at
Dino Headquarters:

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

P.S. 4. Thought for the Day: "You can train at any
age -- but you need to train smarter as you grow
older." -- Brooks Kubik

*********************************************

I Need Feedback on the John Grimek Training Course!

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

I have two quick favors for the Dino Nation:

1. If you have a copy of my John Grimek
Training course, pls shoot me an email with
a one or two line review or testimonial for
the little monster.

1a. If you don't have the Grimek course,
now's a good time to grab a copy:

http://www.brookskubik.com/johngrimek_course.html

1b. Also, let me know who or what you'd
like us to cover in future courses!

2. If you have either of my new e-books,
pls post reviews on our Amazon Kindle
pages. The reviews really help us:

http://www.brookskubik.com/militarypress_kindle.html

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_secrets_01.html

2a. I think you can post a review even if you
have the hard-copy versions of the courses,
although you probably need to say that in
your review.

Thanks, and much appreciated!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. If you ordered issue no. 2 of the Dinosaur
Files quarterly, let me know how you like it --
and what we can do to make the next issue
even better. I included some specific questions
for you in this issue, and I need your feedback
on them.

****************************************

Is Strength Training the Fountain of Youth?

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

A quick note, and then we'll talk training.

We filled 90% of the outstanding orders
for issue no. 2 of The Dinosaur Files quarterly
on Sat, Mon and Tues. There are a few more
to shoot out the door, and we'll do that today.

If you haven't ordered the little monster, do
it now - and grab issue no. 1 of the quarterly
if you missed that one, too. They're great,
and Dinos around the world are loving them:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles_quarterly.html

On the training front, I received an email the
other day from a man who bought copy number
146 of the first edition of Dinosaur Training.

When I released Dinosaur Training back in 1996,
I signed and numbered every copy -- all 3300
of them.

Many of you have them. You've been reading
my stuff and sharing the journey with me for
almost 20 years.

That's what reader no. 146 has been doing.

Another reader shot in an email that I saw
this morning. He's been following me since
the days when I wrote for Hardgainer. That
takes us back almost a quarter of a century.

If you think about it, that's pretty amazing.

One reason that it's amazing is that those
long-time Dinos have been training for a
very long time -- and they're still training.

Just like me.

I've been training for almost 50 years now.
And I've enjoyed every minute of it.

Many Dinos have been training for 30 or
40 years -- some for 50 or more -- and a
surprising number for 60 or more years.

That goes to show you that strength training
is the fountain of youth.

It keeps you young -- because you can keep
on doing it for your entire life.

You can't do that with most sports. There
comes a time when your body just can't take
it any more. You hang up your cleats, your
shoes, your bat or your gloves.

But strength training is different.

You can always modify your strength training
workouts, and make them work for you at any
age.

In addition, strength training is something you
can do by yourself. You don't need a team to
do strength training. You don't even need a
training partner. That, too, makes it easy to
keep at it.

And perhaps most importantly, strength training
is endlessly interesting.There are always new
things to try -- and new things to learn. It
never gets old.

And the results are right there, for you to see --
and for the world to see.

After a lifetime of sensible physical training,
you look *different* than other people your
age. You look, move and feel like you were
20 years younger.

And that's why I call strength training the
Fountain of Youth.

As always, thanks for reading, and have a great
day. If you train today, make it a good one!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. 1. Gray Hair and Black Iron is the number one
training guide for mature Dinos. Go here to grab a
copy:

http://www.brookskubik.com/grayhair_blackiron.html

P.S. 2. Our Dinosaur Training e-books are getting
off-the-chart reviews. Go here to grab them:

http://www.brookskubik.com/militarypress_kindle.html

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_secrets_01.html

P.S. 3. My other books and courses are right here at
Dino Headquarters:

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

P.S. 4. Thought for the Day: "I'm not as young
as I used to be, but I'm younger than I'd be
if I didn't train." -- Brooks Kubik (and
a heck of a lot of other Dinos)

************************************************

Seven Rules I Break All the Time!

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

Many years ago, a flaming barbell plate appeared
in the sky over Muscle Beach.

It spun for hours, then slowly dropped to the silver
sands.

The musclemen approached it cautiously and
slowly.

It had words etched into it.

They became the training rules that everyone
followed from that day forward.

Except for me.

I don't follow them.

And neither should you.

So let me share seven "rules" that I don't follow:

1. Train every day on a split routine.

2. Isolate your muscles when you train.

3. Train for a pump.

4. Your goal is to look like a bodybuilding
champion.

5. Eat six meals a day without fail, and be sure
to get 300 to 400 grams of protein.

6. Consume massive amounts of food supplements.

7. Load up on roidskies.

My approach is a little bit different.

I train for strength, and I focus on basic, compound
exercises.

I don't try to isolate my muscles when I train. To
the contrary, I do many total body exercises, such
as squats, deadlifts and Olympic weightlifting. I
haven't figured out how to isolate my rear delts
or the upper outer head of the triceps when I do
a squat snatch or a clean and jerk.

I don't train for a pump. I train for function. I
measure my progress by adding weight to the
bar.

My goal is to build strength and health. The two
aspects of that goal -- strength and health --
are both important -- and they are closely
connected.

My workouts are designed to build strength and
health throughout the entire body. Not just the
muscles. The entire body, inside and out.

My workouts strengthen my internal organs and
promote healthy functioning throughout my
body. Thus, they build organic health.

My workouts are fun. They're the highlight of my
day. They make me feel great. And that's another
health-building part of the program. It's also why
I'm still out in the garage, hitting the iron like
clockwork at close to age 60 -- and after almost
half a century of doing it.

I don't use supplements. They're not necessary.
In many cases, they're counter-productive,
especially if they upset your digestive system,
or if they distract you from eating real food.
I don't force-feed and I don't consume massive
amounts of protein. It's not necessary. (I do,
however, eat plenty of good food -- and it's real
food from local farmers and growers -- and I
have a vegetable garden where I grow much of
our food. I don't minimize the importance of a
healthy diet, I just define it much differently than
most people. See Knife, Fork, Muscle for further
information about my approach to diet and
nutrition for strength and health.)

I don't take roidskies. They're not necessary, either.
And no matter what anyone tells you, they're not
good for you. Neither are the gray-market supplements
that mimic them.

In short, I'm a bit of a rebel -- or at least, a muscle-
building non-conformist.

Or you could call me a dinosaur.

That works, too.

As always, thanks for reading and have a great day.
If you train today, make it a good one!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. For more about common sense diet and nutrition
for strength training and muscle building, grab Knife,
Fork, Muscle:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_nutrition.html

P.S. 2. We have two great Dinosaur Training e-books
on Amazon's Kindle site. Go here to grab them:

http://www.brookskubik.com/militarypress_kindle.html

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_secrets_01.html

P.S. 3. My other books and courses are right here:

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html


P.S. 4. Thought for the Day: "Rules are made to be
broken, but it's still a good idea to work hard on your
squats." -- Brooks Kubik

*********************************************

Do You Want to Be a Monster?

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

Breaking news -- I'll be on Carl Lanore's
SuperHuman Radio at 12:00 noon today
(that's EST). Catch it live or listen to the
download ayc. It will be a good show.

In other news, issue no. 2 of the Dinosaur
Files quarterly was printed on Friday. We
mailed some of the issues on Saturday,
and we'll try to get the rest of them out
the door today. If you forgot to order a
copy, do it now -- we have extras:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles_quarterly.html

On the training front, let's talk about one
of the most interesting advertising
campaigns in barbell history.

Back in the mid-1950's, Harry Paschall
came up with an ad for the York Barbell
Company. This was at the height of the
Hoffman-Weider feud, and you can see
very quickly that Harry was supporting
the York side in his ad.

But he was also supporting old-school
physical culture as opposed to modern
bodybuilding.

What he says is worth reading -- and
worth thinking about. Particularly today,
when everyone wants to look "freaky"
or look like a "monster" -- and when
so many turn to roidskies to try to
achieve that look.

Harry's barbell ad read like this:

"Without question barbells offer you the
quickest and surest means of developing
your body, strengthening your muscles and
improving your athletic ability. BUT consider
carefully before you buy a barbell. A sensible
buyer should first investigate the claims of
the various competing manufacturers. There
are many good reasons why York is the
oldest, largest and best known company
in this field.

DO YOU WANT TO BE A MONSTER?

A barbell in inexperienced hands may well
become an instrument of destruction and
distortion. Therefore, a barbell is only as
good as the course of instruction behind it.
There are certain 'muscle-bulging' courses
marketed today that create monsters instead
of men.

The natural, trim, well-proportioned athletic
lines of the body are distorted by unnatural
exercise methods into ugly lumps, varicose
veins, ruptured and swollen tissues.

Men trained by such methods lose speed,
range of movement, flexibility and muscular
coordination.

We are reluctant to believe that any young
man in his right mind wants to look like a
freak."

Harry was almost 60 years old when he came
up with this ad -- and although I love Harry
Paschall dearly and view him as a mentor and
as a friend, I think he was behind the times on
this one.

Not because his message (or warning) was
wrong -- but because by 1956, when Harry
wrote, this, it was already too late. The horse
was out of the barn. The young guys all wanted
to look like freaks and monsters.

I think that's continued to the present day --
and I think it's a problem for physical culture.

But maybe I'm wrong. Maybe there are still
plenty of trainees who are more interested in
strength and health than in looking like a
monster. What do you think?

As always, thanks for reading and have a great
day. if you train today, Make it a good one!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. Our Dinosaur Training e-books are getting
off-the-chart reviews. Go here to grab them:

http://www.brookskubik.com/militarypress_kindle.html

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_secrets_01.html

And please post a review for us -- the reviews really
help!

P.S. 2. My other books and courses are right here:

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

P.S. 3. Thought for the Day: "Train for lifelong strength
and health, and everything else will be just fine. "
-- Brooks Kubik

********************************************