How to Train for the Sig Klein Dumbbell Challenge

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

Two quick notes, and then we'll talk training.

1. The February Dinosaur Files.

Is ready, and Dinos around the world are
loving it. Go here to grab the little monster:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles_february2016.html

And be sure to send feed-back on this issue.
We love to hear from you!

2. Shipping Quotes.

We can usually save you some serious clams
by shipping two or three books or courses
in one package. This is especially true for
international orders. If you want to order
several items with international shipping,
please email first and ask for a shipping
quote. Include your shipping address in
your email.

3. How to Train for the Sig Klein Dumbbell
Challenge.


Not long ago, I sent out an email about Sig
Klein's legendary dumbbell challenge. It's
to perform 12 continuous reps in the two
dumbbell clean and press with a pair of 75
pound dumbbells.

You do the first rep from the floor, and all
of the following reps from the hang.

You do one clean and one press on each
rep.

It's pretty darn tough. Klein estimated that
less than 10 men in the United States could
meet the challenge. Klein was one of them --
and he only weighed a shade over 150 pounds,
so he was doing 12 continuous reps in the
two-dumbbell clean and press with a total
weight just under his own bodyweight!

Yesterday I got an email about how to train
for the dumbbell challenge. One of our Dinos
gave it a try, and managed 12 reps with a
pair of 55 pound dumbbells. He wanted to
know how to move up to 75 pounders.

Here's my advice:

1. Don't stick to 12 rep sets exclusively. Mix
things up. If you do multiple sets of 12 reps
in the two dumbbell clean and press, you're
asking for trouble -- as in, very sore inner
elbows and wrists. Mixing things up will help
avoid this.

2. For example, you might try 5 x 5 in one
workout. That allows you to work up to
heavier weights, which will build more
strength, and make the weight feel lighter
when you try your higher rep sets.

3. In another workout, do 10/8/6. If you
need warm-up sets, then do two or three
warm-up sets. Use anything from 5 to 10
reps in the warm-up sets.

4. Holding onto the dumbbells will be
tough when you do those 12 rep sets.
So train your grip by doing a set of
dumbbell shrugs immediately after
your final set of clean and press. Do
10 to 12 reps in the shrug.

a. If you prefer, do dumbbell deadlifts
after each set of the two dumbbell clean
and press -- or do the farmer's walk --
or do a timed hold after your final set.
b. Do the extra grip work after the final
set only -- because you will fry your
grip, and that means you won't be able
to safely perform another set of clean
and press.

5. Work the two-dumbbell curl and
press into your program. This allows
lighter training days that will have good
carry-over to the heavier days when you
do the two-dumbbell clean and press.

6. Do other dumbbell exercises. The
more dumbbell training you do, the
better you become at handling heavy
dumbbells. And using different exercises
helps avoid over-use problems from doing
just one movement.

a. I would do the two dumbbell clean and
press once a week, and do other dumbbell
exercises once a week -- and do another
workout where I focus on leg training
and rest my arms and shoulders.

b. See Dinosaur Dumbbell Training for
tons of other dumbbell exercises.

7. Include squats, push-ups and pull-ups.
You need plenty of conditioning to do 12
non-stop reps in the two-dumbbell clean
and press. Squats, push-ups and pull-ups
will help.

a. See Chalk and Sweat for some leg training
workiouts that will help build strength and
stamina -- and see Dinosaur Bodyweight
Training
for some great push-up and pull-up
variations.

Those tips ought to help you hit Klein's
dumbbell challenge. But don't rush things.
It's a tough challenge, and it will take time
to get there.

If anyone else is working to meet Klein's
challenge, shoot me an email and let me
know what you're doing and how it's
working for you.

As always, thanks for reading and have a
great day. If you train today, make it a
good one!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. I mentioned Dinosaur Dumbbell Training
and Dinosaur Bodyweight Training. Go here
to grab them:

Dinosaur Dumbbell Training

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_dumbbelltraining.html

Dinosaur Bodyweight Training

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_bodyweight.html

P.S. 2. My other books and courses -- and
links to my Dinosaur Training books and
courses on Kindle -- are right here:

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

P.S. 3. Thought for the Day: "Challenge yourself.
Make every workout a step on the road to the top
of the mountain." -- Brooks Kubik

***********************************************************************************

Sensible and Effective Calf Training

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

Buried somewhere in my email box is a
question from a reader about calf training.
It's a good one, so I thought I'd answer it
in an email to the entire group.

It's a three part question. My answers
follow each of the questions:

Q. Have you ever read Arnold's book, The
Education of a Bodybuilder?

A. Yes, many, many years ago.

Q. Do you agree with his statement in the
book that the calves are the most difficult
muscle to develop?

A. Yes and no. They are very difficult for
some people, but not for others. Bodybuilder
Chris Dickerson was famous for his massive
calf development, but according to Arthur
Jones he had a twin brother who never
trained but who had even BIGGER calves!

Q. Do you believe that the only way to make
your calves grow is to bomb them mercilessly
with a muscle-blasting blitzkrieg of exercises,
sets, reps and weight?

A. No, not at all. I think there's a much better
and more effective way to train your calves.

Back in the day, the muscle magazines
would always run an article every so often
that said the calves are a very dense muscle
group because of all the walking we do -- and
the only way to make them grow is to do a
super program of daily workouts, many
different exercises, and plenty of sets
and reps.

I remember reading one of those articles
when I was in high school.

The next day, I went to the school weight
room and did day one of the author's
recommended program.

I couldn't walk right for two weeks.

And that's the problem with the super-duper
high volume calf workouts. They can literally
cripple you.

To me, it makes much more sense to just do
ONE calf exercise in any given workout -- for
two to five sets -- and give your body time to
adopt to the program and start to show some
results. You can train hard without overdoing
things and without developing extreme
muscular soreness.

If you have the genetics for big calves, this
simple approach will work perfectly fine and
everyone else will THINK you have some kind
of secret workout.

If you do NOT have the genetics for big calves,
this simple approach will build strong lower legs
and help to injury-proof your feet and ankles --
without the risk of over-training.

As far as exercises go, the basic calf raise on
a calf machine is hard to beat. Do five sets of
8 to 10 reps and gradually work up to heavy
weight. Reg Park famously used 800 to 1,000
pounds in his calf raises.

If you don't have access to a calf machine, do
one-legged calf raises while holding a dumbbell
in one hand. Do sets of 10 to 20 reps.

People always asked Arthur Jones to build a
special machine for calf raises. He refused to
do so because one-legged calf raises were so
effective.

And Chuck Sipes used to train his calves in a
very low-tech way. He did them in a power rack,
and allowed the barbell to slide up and down
against the uprights so he could keep his
balance. He would stand with his toes on
two old bricks to increase his range of
movement. It worked pretty well -- he
was one of the top bodybuilders in the
world, and one of the strongest -- and
he had terrific calves.

So calf training is like anything else. Keep it
simple, train hard and focus on quality rather
than quantity.

Works every time.

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. Have you seen the February issue of The
Dinosaur Files? We're getting great feedback
on the little monster:

February 2016 Dinosaur Files

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles_february2016.html

P.S. 2. If you missed the December and January
issues, go here to grab them:

January 2016 Dinosaur Files

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles_januaryr2016.html

December 2015 Dinosaur Files

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles_december2015.html

P.S. 3. My other books and courses are right
here at Dino Headquarters:

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

P.S. 4. Thought for the Day: "Those aren't
calves, they're cows!" -- Classic line repeated
by many over the years

***********************************************************************************

News, Notes, Updates and Questions for Dinosaurs!

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

I need to cover a bunch of different
topics this morning, so let's get going!

1. The February Dinosaur Files

We just released the February issue of
the Dinosaur Files. Go here to grab it:

February 2016 Dinosaur Files

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles_february2016.html

If you missed the December and January
issues, go here to grab them:

January 2016 Dinosaur Files

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles_januaryr2016.html

December 2015 Dinosaur Files

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles_december2015.html

And, as always, a very big THANK YOU to
everyone who reads and enjoys The
Dinosaur Files! Your support and your
enthusiasm means the world to us.

2. Tommy Kono

As I noted last week, Tommy Kono is
very ill, and may not be with us much
longer. If you'd like to send him a card
or letter to wish him well and to thank
him for everything he has done for the
Iron Game, send it to me and I will
forward it to Tommy.

Mail it to me at this address:

Tommy Kono
c/o Dinosaur Training
PO Box 4426
Louisville, Ky 40204

We've had a terrific response so far --
but please step up and take action if
you have not already done so. I know
it will mean a great deal to Tommy.

3. Follow Me on Instagram, Facebook
and Twitter!


I'm posting some great photos and video
on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter. Be
sure to follow me and join the fun. And
hit the LIKE and SHARE buttons as much
as you can. (Consider it "active rest" for
your thumbs and fingers.)

I'm on Facebook at Brooks Kubik.

I'm on Twitter at #brookskubik and
#dinosaurtraining.

And I'm right here on Instagram:

https://www.instagram.com/brooks_kubik/

4. Dinosaur Training DVD's

I still carry my Dinosaur Training DVD's
and my Bodyweight Training DVD's -- but
I've also let John Wood upload them at
his member site, The Iron League. Of course,
there's a ton of other great stuff at The Iron
League  -- including some things that are so
rare that I've never seen them anywhere
else -- or even knew they existed. And that's
saying a lot, because I've been collecting Iron
Game books, courses and magazines for close
to 50 years, and I thought I had "seen it all."
Go here to join up:

http://www.ironleague.com/

5. Dinosaur Training Seminars

Are you interested in attending a Dinosaur
Training seminar here in Louisville?

Are you a gym owner -- and would you like
to host a Dinosaur Training seminar?

If the answer to either question is "Yes!" then
shoot me an email. If there's enough interest,
we can make start doing some seminars this
year.

The Wrap-Up

There's more to cover, but that's enough for
now. As always, thanks for reading and have
a great day. If you train today, make it a good
one!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. You can find all of my books and courses
right here at Dino Headquarters:

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

P.S. 2. Thought for the Day: "The more you
do, the more you CAN do." -- Brooks Kubik

***********************************************************************************

Safe and Effective Lower Body Training for Older Dinos!

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

Back in December, Trudi and I were
talking about training -- and she asked
me about squats for older trainees and
whether I thought they were a good
idea or a bad idea.

Of course, it's one of those "it depends"
questions -- but it was a very interesting
one.

I ran the question by the Dinos in one of
my daily emails -- and the answers starting
pouring in faster than you could say the
Dinosaur motto ("Hard work, heavy iron,
super strength.")

Before you knew it, I had close to 50 responses
from older Dinos. Some of them were just a
sentence or two, and some were a page or
two long.

The Dinos shared some remarkable stories.

Some Dinos used back squats to CURE
serious knee, hip or back problems.

Some Dinos were still squatting hard and
heavy in their 70's.

We received one report of a lifting champion
who is still doing back squats, front squats
and Olympic lifting in his 90's!

Other Dinos had switched to other movements,
and they outlined what was working for them.

Some combined squats with other exercises.

Some used movements you probably have
heard about but may never have tried -- or
used very unique equipment to train their
legs, hips and back. Again, stuff that may
not be on your radar screen -- but stuff
you ought to know about.

Several older Dinos didn't start doing squats
until they were close to retirement age -- and
then they made terrific progress on them.

And many outlined the sets and reps, and the
training frequency, that worked best for them.
It was real-world, no nonsense, straight from
the shoulder training advice.

Training advice from men who are walking the
walk -- and still hitting it hard and heavy no
matter how many candles are on the birthday
cake.

Stuff you don't see anywhere else -- because
the rest of the world is more interested in the
silly stuff. One-legged squats on wobble boards
while wearing a suit of armor and walking a pet
penquin perched on a pogo stick.

The rest of the world also tends to ignore the
unique needs of older trainees and focus almost
exclusively on the young lions. That's totally
understandable, but it leaves a big gap in the
information that older trainees need to be
successful.

Anyhow -- when I saw the responses, I knew
I had to share them. So I ran about half of them
in the January issue of The Dinosaur Files.

And then I ran the other half in the February
issue of the Dinosaur Files.

You can grab them right here -- and while you're
at it, you might as well grab the December issue
if you missed it. It has plenty of good stuff, too.

February 2016 Dinosaur Files (cover photo of Robert
Ruckstool)

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles_february2016.html

January 2016 Dinosaur Files (cover photo of Eugene Sandow)

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles_januaryr2016.html

December 2015 Dinosaur Files (cover photo of Sig Klein)

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles_december2015.html

Of course, the Dinosaur Files contains plenty
of different articles in each issue -- but the
series covering effective lower body training
for older Dinos is solid gold. After all, you're
either an older Dino right now -- or you're
going to be one sometime in the future!

As always, thanks for reading and have a
great day. If you train today, make it a good
one!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. My other books and courses are right
here at Dino Headquarters:

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

P.S. 2. "You're never strong enough, and you
never know enough about training. Always
keep growing, learning, advancing and moving
forward." -- Brooks Kubik

***********************************************************************************

34 Pages and Tons of Terrific Training Tips!

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

The February issue of the Dinosaur Files
is available now, and it's another great
issue.

The little monster weighs in at a whopping
34 pages, and it features a ton of terrific
training tips.

In addition to my own original articles, it
includes tips, advice, thoughts, ideas and
suggestions from John Grimek, Bob
Hoffman,Orison Swett Marden, and
something like two dozen of your
fellow Dinosaurs!

There's even something from some
Russian researchers from back in the
1970's. It's pretty important -- and a
little bit scary. It's also something the
mainstream muscle magazines should
have been telling us -- but instead, they
told us the exact opposite!

Here's the Table of Contents:

Hail to the Dinosaurs!
(by Brooks Kubik)

Mesozoic Mail
(by the Dinosaurs)

Jurassic Jottings
(by Brooks Kubik)

The Best Place to Train
(by Brooks Kubik)

An Older Dino's Winter Workout
(by Clifford M. Levy, MD)

Dumbbells for Strength and Conditioning
(by John Grahill)

Safe and Effective Lower Body Training for
Older Dinos - No One Size Fits All! (Part 2)
(by Brooks Kubik)

The Vacation Workout
(by Allan Roth)

The Wrap-Up
(by Brooks Kubik)

We're already getting great reviews from
Dinos who have downloaded and read the
little monster. They're loving the content,
as well as the speed and convenience of the
PDF format and immediate electronic
download. And our Canadian and overseas
Dinos are loving the fact that there's no
postage -- it saves them some major
clams.

Go here to grab the little monster -- and
be sure to let me know how you like the
little monster:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles_february2016.html

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. If you missed the December and January
issues of The Dinosaur Files, go here to grab
them:

December (cover photo of Sig Klein)

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles_december2015.html

January (cover photo of Eugene Sandow)

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles_januaryr2016.html

P.S. 2. My other books and courses are right
here at Dino Headquarters:

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

P.S. 3. Thought for the Day: "The more you know
about sensible, effective, no-nonsense strength
training and muscle building, the better your
results will be." -- Brooks Kubik

***********************************************************************************

34 Pages and Tons of Terrific Training Tips!

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

The February issue of the Dinosaur Files
is available now, and it's another great
issue.

The little monster weighs in at a whopping
34 pages, and it features a ton of terrific
training tips.

In addition to my own original articles, it
includes tips, advice, thoughts, ideas and
suggestions from John Grimek, Bob
Hoffman,Orison Swett Marden, and
something like two dozen of your
fellow Dinosaurs!

There's even something from some
Russian researchers from back in the
1970's. It's pretty important -- and a
little bit scary. It's also something the
mainstream muscle magazines should
have been telling us -- but instead, they
told us the exact opposite!

Here's the Table of Contents:

Hail to the Dinosaurs!
(by Brooks Kubik)

Mesozoic Mail
(by the Dinosaurs)

Jurassic Jottings
(by Brooks Kubik)

The Best Place to Train
(by Brooks Kubik)

An Older Dino's Winter Workout
(by Clifford M. Levy, MD)

Dumbbells for Strength and Conditioning
(by John Grahill)

Safe and Effective Lower Body Training for
Older Dinos - No One Size Fits All! (Part 2)
(by Brooks Kubik)

The Vacation Workout
(by Allan Roth)

The Wrap-Up
(by Brooks Kubik)

We're already getting great reviews from
Dinos who have downloaded and read the
little monster. They're loving the content,
as well as the speed and convenience of the
PDF format and immediate electronic
download. And our Canadian and overseas
Dinos are loving the fact that there's no
postage -- it saves them some major
clams.

Go here to grab the little monster -- and
be sure to let me know how you like the
little monster:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles_february2016.html

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. If you missed the December and January
issues of The Dinosaur Files, go here to grab
them:

December (cover photo of Sig Klein)

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles_december2015.html

January (cover photo of Eugene Sandow)

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles_januaryr2016.html

P.S. 2. My other books and courses are right
here at Dino Headquarters:

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

P.S. 3. Thought for the Day: "The more you know
about sensible, effective, no-nonsense strength
training and muscle building, the better your
results will be." -- Brooks Kubik

***********************************************************************************

Here It Is - The February Dinosaur Files!

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

Here's the February issue of the
Dinosaur Files newsletter:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles_february2016.html

Grab it now - and let me know
how you like the little monster!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. How about that cover photo?